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Ten Questions You Must Ask Before Accepting a Job Offer

Posted on 20th October 2016 by Katrina Docherty

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The MAYDAY Recruitment team know all to well that the road to finding a new role can sometimes be a long and arduous one. So when you get that job offer, it is important to make sure that you are asking all of the right questions to make sure each of your needs and wants is satisfied.


Liz Ryan is CEO/founder of Human Workplace and author of Reinvention Roadmap posted this comprehensive list of questions in Forbes and we think it is a great “Top 10” to get as much information as possible before accepting a job offer. Do you agree? Do let us know which other questions you would include:

Ten Questions You Must Ask Before Accepting A Job Offer:

  1. What are the working hours here?
  2. How much flexibility in working hours or location (e.g., working from home) is customary in your department?
  3. What is considered a normal workday here?
  4. How “reachable” do you need or expect the person in this role to be, particularly during the evenings and on weekends?
  5. How do paid time off, including vacation, personal and sick time work in this company?
  6. What are your expectations around communication? Do you prefer to use email, face-to-face conversations, the telephone or text to communicate? How fast a response time from me do you expect, especially after hours?
  7. Will the person in this job take work home, and if so what are your expectations around work performed at night and on the weekends?
  8. What set of criteria will you use to evaluate my performance in this role?
  9. How much business travel, if any, should I expect to do in this job?
  10. What will my level of authority and decision-making responsibility in this role? Will I have a budget, and if so how is that budget allocated and managed?

You probably won’t have the chance to ask all these questions in one sitting. You will drip out the questions during your interviews with your hiring manager, and if necessary get any missing answers by phone or email as you get closer to the job offer stage.


We have to keep in mind that accepting a job offer is no different from entering into any other business relationship. You have to know the terms of the deal before you step into the job. Find your voice and ask these questions and avoid snakebites!